9 Best Exercises To Do On A Pullup Bar To Build Strength

0
45
Best Exercises To Do On A Pullup Bar

Affiliate disclosure: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. All opinions remain my own. You can learn more about our editorial policies here.

A pullup bar is one of the most versatile pieces of equipment you can have in your home gym. It allows you to do a variety of exercises that work different muscle groups, and it’s a great way to add intensity to your workout routine. Here are the best exercises to do on a pullup bar-check them out!

Pull Up Muscle Groups Worked

A pullup bar is a great piece of equipment to have in your home gym because it is versatile and can help you work different muscle groups. The muscles that are worked by pull ups include:

Pull ups muscle groups worked

Latissimus Dorsi

The latissimus dorsi is a large, flat muscle that extends from the lower back to the upper arm. It is responsible for several important functions, including internal rotation of the arm, adduction of the arm, and extension of the spine.

The latissimus dorsi is often referred to as the “lats” or the “wings” due to its distinctive shape. This muscle is a key player in many common exercises, such as pull-ups, chin-ups, and rows. Developing a strong latissimus dorsi can help to improve posture and prevent back pain.

Teres Major

The Teres major is a muscle in the shoulder that helps to rotate and extend the arm. It is one of three muscles that make up the rotator cuff, and it is the largest of the three. The Teres major is attached to the shoulder blade at one end, and to the humerus (upper arm bone) at the other.

Sensitive to caffeine but looking to boost your performance, see our picks for Best Caffeine Free Pre Workout

The muscle gets its name from its shape – “teres” means ” round,” and “major” indicates that it is the larger of two similar muscles in the shoulder (the other being the Teres minor). The Teres major works together with the other muscles of the rotator cuff to move the arm. It also helps to stabilize the shoulder joint. This muscle is particularly important for overhead activities such as throwing a ball or reaching for something on a high shelf.

Posterior Deltoid

The posterior deltoid is a large muscle located in the back of the shoulder. It is responsible for moving the arm away from the body and for stabilizing the shoulder joint. The posterior deltoid is busiest during activities such as overhead presses and rows.

In order to target this muscle, it is important to use exercises that involve abduction (moving the arm away from the body) and horizontal extension (moving the arm backward). Some effective posterior deltoid exercises include dumbbell lateral raises, Dumbbell Posterior Deltoid Flyes, and Seated cable rows. When performing these exercises, be sure to use a weight that is heavy enough to challenge the muscle but not so heavy that it causes pain in the shoulder joint.

Biceps Brachii

The biceps brachii, more commonly known as the biceps, is a two-headed muscle located in the upper arm. It is responsible for flexing the elbow and supinating the forearm. The biceps gets its name from its two heads, which originate on the scapula and insert on the radius. The biceps is a relatively small muscle compared to other muscles in the arm, but it is very powerful due to its anatomical position.

Nutrition does not have to taste bad, Tips to Make Protein Shakes Taste Better

The biceps is also one of the most visible muscles in the body, which has made it a popular choice for bodybuilders and fitness enthusiasts. While the biceps is mostly used for pulling movements, it can also be engaged in pushing movements such as the shoulder press. Ultimately, the biceps is an important muscle for both conventional strength training and functional fitness.

Brachioradialis

The brachioradialis is a muscle in the forearm that is responsible for flexing the arm at the elbow. It is located on the lateral (outside) aspect of the forearm and attaches to the humerus, the long bone in the upper arm. The brachioradialis gets its name from its attachments: the “brachium” refers to the upper arm, while the “radius” refers to the forearm bone on the same side.

The muscle typically works in conjunction with other muscles in the forearm, such as the biceps brachii, to produce movement. Although it is not as large or powerful as some of the other muscles in the arm, the brachioradialis plays an important role in a variety of activities, such as lifting objects or bending the elbow.

Best Exercises To Do On A Pullup Bar

Below are some of the best exercises to get the most out of your pull-up bar for an entire body workout.

Burpee Pull-Ups

The burpee pull-up is a challenging movement that requires both strength and coordination. To perform the exercise, start in a standing position with your feet shoulder-width apart. From here, squat down and place your hands on the ground in front of you. Kick your legs back so that you are in a push-up position, then perform a push-up. As you come up, jump your feet back to the squatting position and stand up, then reach overhead and pull your body up into a chin-up position. Slowly bring yourself back to the starting position and repeat.

This exercise works multiple muscle groups including the chest, shoulders, triceps, and core. It is an excellent movement for developing strength and improving conditioning.

Hanging Knee Raise

Best Exercises To Do On A Pullup Bar - Hanging Knee Raise

The hanging knee raise is a great exercise for targeting the abdominal muscles and build core strength. To do this exercise, you will need a pull-up bar. Start by hanging from the pull-up bar with your legs straight. From here, raise your knees up towards your chest.

Once your knees are at chest level, pause for a moment and then slowly lower them back down to the starting position. You can increase the difficulty of this exercise by wearing a weight belt or holding a weight plate between your feet. For best results, perform 3 sets of 10-12 repetitions.

Negative pull-up

The pull-up is one of the most common exercises performed on a pull-up bar. However, many people don’t realize that there are actually two different types of pull-ups: the positive pull-up and the negative pull ups. The positive pull-up is the more traditional version of the exercise, where you start from a hanging position and then pull yourself up until your chin is over the bar.

Negative pull-ups, on the other hand, starts from a position where your chin is already over the bar. From there, you lower yourself down until your arms are fully extended. Because the negative pull-up is performed in the opposite direction of the positive pull-up, it puts greater emphasis on the eccentric (lowering) portion of the exercise. As a result, it can be a great tool for building strength and improving muscle endurance.

Chin Ups

Chin-ups

Chin-ups are a great exercise for toning your arms, shoulders and back, but they can be tough to master. The key is to find the right pull-up bar. Look for a bar that is wide enough to grip comfortably and has a smooth finish to avoid chafing your hands. If you’re new to pull-ups, start with an assisted pull-up machine or use a resistance band to help you get started. Once you’ve mastered the motion, aim for three sets of eight to twelve reps. With practice, you’ll be able to chin up with ease.

Forearm pull-up

The forearm pull-up is a challenging upper-body exercise that targets the muscles of the arms, shoulders, and back muscles. To do a forearm pull-up, start by gripping a pull-up bar with your palms facing away from you and your hands shoulder-width apart. Bend your knees and cross your ankles behind you. From this position, pull yourself up until your chin clears the bar. Lower yourself back to the starting position and repeat.

The forearm pull-up is a great way to build strength and definition in the upper body. However, it can be difficult to perform if you don’t have the necessary grip strength. If you’re just starting out, try doing pull-ups with an overhand grip or using assistance from a friend or piece of equipment. With practice, you’ll be able to do forearm pull-ups like a pro!

Hanging bicycles

Everything is more difficult while hanging from a bar than doing bicycle crunches. Hands should be placed shoulder-width apart with your arms fully extended, and use an overhand grip. One leg at a time, kick out as you drop it towards your torso. One leg should rise as the other descends, and vice versa. Pedal as hard as you can, whether it’s for reps or for the clock.

Toes to bar

Toes to bar is a popular exercise that is often used as a measure of fitness. The exercise is simple: start by hanging from a pull-up bar with your arms extended, then bring your feet up so that your toes touch the bar. Return to the starting position and repeat.

Home gym gear guides, Best Dumbbell Racks for Home Gyms

While the exercise may seem straightforward, it can be challenging to maintain good form throughout the entire range of motion. As such, it is important to practice toes to bar with good form before attempting to increase the speed or number of repetitions. When done correctly, toes to bar is an excellent exercise for developing strength and coordination.

Hanging Leg Raise

The hanging leg raise is a great exercise for strengthening the abdominal muscles. To do the exercise, start by hanging from a pull-up bar with your arms extended and your legs straight. From there, raise your legs up until they are parallel with the ground. Lower them back down to the starting position and repeat.

If you find that your arms start to tire before your legs, try bending your knees and crossing your ankles behind you. This will take some of the strain off of your arms and allow you to focus on working your abs.

Pull-Ups

Pull-ups

Last but not least, the traditional pull-up. This exercise is a mainstay in many strength and conditioning programs, and for good reason. Pull-ups are a great way to build upper-body strength and can be easily modified to target different muscle groups. To perform a pull-up, grip a pull-up bar with your palms facing away from you and your arms shoulder-width apart. Bend your knees and cross your ankles behind you. From this position, pull yourself up until your chin clears the bar. Lower yourself back to the starting position and repeat.

Tips If You Cannot Do A Pullup

If you are not quite ready for pull-ups, there are still a variety of exercises you can do on a pull-up bar to build strength.

Partial Pull Ups

Try doing a dead hang from the bar with your arms extended, or try doing inverted rows by lying underneath the bar and pulling yourself up so that your chest meets the bar.

Resistance Band Assisted Pull-ups

You can also use resistance bands to assist you in performing pull-ups. Resistance band assisted pull-ups are a great way to build strength and can be easily scaled as your strength improves.

Spotter Assisted Pullups

If you have a friend or family member who is willing to help, they can spot you while you do pull-ups. To do this, have them stand behind you and grab your ankles as you perform the exercise.

Jumping Pullups

Jumping pullups are a great way to build upper-body strength and can be modified to make the exercise easier or more difficult.

Incinerate fat with our HIIT Cycle Workout

To do a jumping pullup, start by standing underneath a pull-up bar in a squat position. Jump up and grab the bar with your palms facing away from you and your arms shoulder-width apart. From this position, pull yourself up until your chin clears the bar. Slowly lower yourself back to the starting position and repeat. You can make the exercise more difficult by adding weight to a backpack or by wearing a weighted vest.

Wrapping Up

Pull-up bars are a versatile piece of equipment that can be used to do a variety of exercises. If you don’t have a pull-up bar, there are still a number of exercises you can do to build strength. With practice, you’ll be able to do all the best exercises on a pull-up bar like a pro!